Industrial Chiller High Pressure Alarm Troubleshooting

air-cooled chiller signIn Air-cooled Chiller

An air-cooled chiller condenser is blown by a fan to dissipate heat, and the causes of high-pressure failures are:

1. Improper running Condenser or High Ambient Temperature

This results in poor heat dissipation from the condenser, i.e. the heat generated inside the refrigeration refrigerant cycle cannot be removed by the fan. So there is a high-pressure alarm.
Solution: Check and repair the fan and exclude dust and debris around the fan cover. After shutdown, clean with compressed air or water gun.

2. Condenser Blockage

This causes the high-pressure refrigerant gas in the refrigerant system to condense improperly so that a large amount of gas accumulates and the machine sounds a high-pressure alarm.
Solution: By cleaning and decontaminating the condenser. Consult the manufacturer for guidance on the exact method.
air-cooled blocked condenser

3. Air in The System

This situation usually occurs in the new machine or compressor maintenance, the refrigeration system mixed with air, resulting in air can not be condensed and kept in the condenser, leading to a high-pressure alarm.
Solution: Open the air separation valve, exhaust port or condenser inlet/outlet to vent the air in the chiller.

4. Excessive Refrigerant

The effect is similar to that caused by entering air. Too much refrigerant cannot be condensed into liquid form, occupying too much condensing pipe area, reducing the condensing effect and thus increasing the pressure.
Solution: Slowly discharge some refrigerant at the low-pressure side.
refrigerants

5. Expansion Valve Opening Too Small or Damaged

The expansion valve is used to throttle the high-pressure liquid refrigerant into a vapor state. If the opening is too small, the pressure in the front side of the condenser will be too high.
Solution: Increase the opening of the expansion valve appropriately.
expansion valve

Water-cooled chiller signIn Water-cooled Chiller

When a water-cooled chiller has a high-pressure alarm, it is mainly related to the cooling water system:

1. Cooling Water Valve is Not Open

The water-cooled unit is supplied with circulating cooling water by a cooling water tower. If you forget to open the cooling water valve when you are using it, the cooling water cannot be circulated and supplied to the chiller.
Solution: Open the cooling water valve.
water fow monitor

2. Too Small Cooling Water Flow or Too High Cooling Water Temperature

Both of these conditions lead to poor heat dissipation, the temperature of the refrigerant cannot be cooled down, and a high-pressure alarm will occur.
Solution: Check whether the size of the piping installed matches the size of the chiller, whether the pump is working properly, or whether the water valve is open to the maximum position.
high temperature

3. Cooling Water Tower Failure

A high-pressure alarm occurs when the cooling tower fails and the cooling water cannot be circulated and supplied to the chiller.
Solution: Check whether the cooling tower is defective.

4. Water Scale

Water-cooled chillers used for a long time without maintenance will easily lead to the accumulation of scale and other debris on the tube wall, which will inevitably affect the effectiveness of the condenser.
Solution: Hire a professional descaling company to remove water scale.
water-cooled condenser scale

5. Excessive Refrigerant

The effect is similar to that caused by entering air. Too much refrigerant cannot be condensed into liquid form, occupying too much condensing pipe area, reducing the condensing effect and thus increasing the pressure.
Solution: Slowly discharge some refrigerant at the low-pressure side.

6. Expansion Valve Opening Too Small or Damaged

The expansion valve is used to throttle the high-pressure liquid refrigerant into a vapor state. If the opening is too small, the pressure on the front side of the condenser will be too high.
Solution: Increase the opening of the expansion valve appropriately.
Also looking for low-pressure alarm troubleshooting? Check this.
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